Category Podcasts

Medieval stone coffin discovered in England
Podcasts

Medieval stone coffin discovered in England

Archaeologists working on the site of a former car park in the English town of Lincoln were surprised to have uncovered a medieval stone coffin.The discovery was made near the Theatre Royal in the centre of Lincoln, which was one of the wealthiest towns in England during the Middle Ages. The team from Network Archaeology, supported by local property developers Jackson and Jackson Developments, have been working there for the last three weeks.

Read More

Podcasts

Hospitals and leper houses in the Latin west during the Middle Ages

Become a PatronWe& 39;ve created a Patreon for Our Site as we want to transition to a more community-funded model.We aim to be the leading content provider about all things medieval. Our website, podcast and Youtube page offers news and resources about the Middle Ages. We hope that are our audience wants to support us so that we can further develop our podcast, hire more writers, build more content, and remove the advertising on our platforms.
Read More
Podcasts

In Our Time: Marco Polo

Marco PoloIn Our Time with Melvyn BraggBBC Radio 4First Played, May 24, 2012Melvyn Bragg and his guests discuss the celebrated Venetian explorer Marco Polo. In 1271 Polo set off on an epic journey through Asia. He was away for more than twenty years, and when he returned to Venice he told extraordinary tales of his adventures.
Read More
Podcasts

Guilt and Creativity in the Works of Geoffrey Chaucer

Guilt and Creativity in the Works of Geoffrey ChaucerRobert MitchellUniversity of Manchester: Doctor of Philosophy, Faculty of Humanities (2012)AbstractThe late Middles Ages saw the development in Europe of increasingly complex, ambitious, and self-conscious forms of creative literature. In the works of poets such as Dante, Petrarch and Chaucer new models of authorship and poetic identity were being explored, new kinds of philosophical and aesthetic value attributed to literary discourse.
Read More
Podcasts

Creation and Food in Old Norse Mythology

Creation and Food in Old Norse MythologyBy Andrea MaraschiPublished Online (2014)What we know about nordic mythology comes from the Eddas, two XIIIth-century texts which represent the written versions of very ancient oral traditions plausibly dating back to the era of migrations and invasions. One of them is a collection of anonymous poems (poetic Edda), while the other one is a prose work signed by the christian historian Snorri Sturluson.
Read More
Podcasts

Charlemagne still kicking 1200 years later or Morangles Early Medieval Holidays

By T.S. MoranglesWhen summer comes, the amateurish History Buff starts looking at the calendar: Anniversary calendar, tell me what happened in?1814… Napoleon horoscope: Not good.1714 … Anne Stuart leaves the stage1614: Nuptials. Pocahontas marries John Rolfe (too late to buy a wedding gift).1514. Another wedding: Henry VIII marries off his buxom sister to King Louis XII of France.
Read More
Podcasts

A British legion stationed near Orléans c. 530?

A British legion stationed near Orléans c. 530?By Howard M. WisemanJournal of the Australian and Early Medieval Association, Volume 7 (2011)Abstract: Several recent books lead the reader to believe that Vita sancti Dalmatii, written in c. 800, records a legio Britannica (a British army) stationed near Orléans in c.
Read More
Podcasts

Silk Tunics of Saint Ambrose to be restored and studied

Archaeologists from the University of Bonn, working with restorers, are preserving and studying 4th-century tunics ascribed to St. In the course of examining these valuable silk garments, they have made surprising scholarly discoveries regarding the development of early relic worship.Saint Ambrose (339-397) is the patron saint of grocers, beekeepers, and gingerbread bakers.
Read More
Podcasts

Foreign dangers: Activities, responsibilities and the problem of women abroad

Foreign dangers: Activities, responsibilities and the problem of women abroadBy Cristina La RoccaPaper given at the 2014 International Medieval Congress, University of LeedsIntroduction: Dear participants of the 2014 International Medieval Congress, first of all I would like to thank Sarah Hamilton and Antonio Sennis for having invited me on behalf of Early Medieval Europe to present this paper for the second edition of the Early Medieval Europe lecture.
Read More
Podcasts

Rabies in medieval Persian literature – the Canon of Avicenna (980–1037 AD)

Rabies in medieval Persian literature – the Canon of Avicenna (980–1037 AD)By Behnam Dalfardi, Mohammad Hosein Esnaashary and Hassan YarmohammadiInfectious Diseases of Poverty, Vol.3:7 (2014)Abstract: Ibn Sina (980–1037 AD), known by his full name Abu Ali al-Hussain ibn Abdallah ibn Sina and the Latin name ‘Avicenna’, was a Persian scholar who is primarily remembered for his contributions to the science of medicine.
Read More
Podcasts

The American Dark Ages and the Terrorist Witch in Season of the Witch

The American Dark Ages and the Terrorist Witch in Season of the WitchTom VercruysseCinej: Cinema Journal, Vol 2, No 2 (2013)AbstractIn this article we argue that Season of the Witch (Sena, 2011) is not to be analyzed according to its faithfulness to the known historical sources, but only by understanding medievalist codes, traditions and (filmic) intertextuality.
Read More
Podcasts

Quiz: A Medieval Who Said That?

Become a PatronWe& 39;ve created a Patreon for Our Site as we want to transition to a more community-funded model.We aim to be the leading content provider about all things medieval. Our website, podcast and Youtube page offers news and resources about the Middle Ages. We hope that are our audience wants to support us so that we can further develop our podcast, hire more writers, build more content, and remove the advertising on our platforms.
Read More
Podcasts

The Problem of Mayda, an Island Appearing on Medieval Maps

The Problem of Mayda, an Island Appearing on Medieval MapsBy William H. BabcockGeographical Review, Vol. 9, No. 4 (1920)Introduction: Of all the legendary islands and island names on the medieval maps, Mayda has been the most enduring. The shape of the island has generally approximated a crescent; its site most often has been far west of lower Brittany and more or less nearly southwest of Ireland; the spelling of the name sometimes has varied to Maida, Mayd, Mayde, Asmaida, or Asmayda.
Read More
Podcasts

Women’s Devotional Bequests of Textiles in the Late Medieval English Parish Church, c.1350-1550

Women’s Devotional Bequests of Textiles in the Late Medieval English Parish Church, c.1350-1550Nicola A. LoweGender & History: Vol.22, No.2 August 2010, pp. 407–429.Abstract‘To the high altare of Stowe my best shete to be an altare cloth, and my best kyrchyff to be a corporax’ When Agnes Sygrave donated these personal possessions to her parish church in 1531, she was making an important statement.
Read More
Podcasts

Did Purchasing Power Parity Hold in Medieval Europe?

Did Purchasing Power Parity Hold in Medieval Europe? Adrian R. Bell, Chris Brooks, and Tony K. Moore (ICMA Centre, Henley Business School, University of Reading)Henley Business School Discussion Paper Series, January (2014)Abstract This paper employs a unique, hand-collected dataset of exchange rates for five major currencies (the lira of Barcelona, the pound sterling of England, the pond groot of Flanders, the florin of Florence and the livre tournois of France) to consider whether the law of one price and purchasing power parity held in Europe during the late fourteenth and early fifteenth centuries.
Read More
Podcasts

Women’s use of religious literature in late medieval England

Women’s use of religious literature in late medieval EnglandBy Anne Marie DuttonPhD thesis, University of York, 1995Abstract: Little scholarly attention has been directed to the subject of women’s activities as readers, listeners, and owners of the religious literature circulating in late medieval England.
Read More
Podcasts

Medieval Warfare Magazine – Volume IV Issue 4

The newest issue of Medieval Warfare hits the magazine shelves on July 31st. The theme for this issue is The Burgundian Wars (1474-1477)Articles on The Burgundian Wars include:Jean-Claude Brunner, ‘Historical introduction – Je lay emprins’.Gabriele Esposito, ‘Tactical organization and structure – Forming the Burgundian lance’.
Read More